Book Review: The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector

“All the world began with a yes” What a book to close this roller-coaster of a year, a stunning and tragic view inside the life of our girl Macabéa, who never knew what it was like to feel an ounce of whatever was good. May that be a thought, an emotion, and even if she did, she would question if it was alright to feel that way. “She had been born with a legacy of misfortune, a creature from nowhere with the expression of someone who apologizes for occupying too much space,” An orphaned child from the poverty-ridden area of northeastern Brazil, Macabéa thrives as a typist. But, she is unwell, impoverished that she could barely even afford pads during her period. She never knew a parent’s love, or much […]

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Infinite

On one Friday afternoon, my mother and I went to the grocery store with the sense of everyday normalcy. I was casually scanning the snack aisle like I would often do until I see an elderly figure at the end of the cookies section that looked strangely familiar. With his thin figure and that signature newsboy cap I thought to myself, “No, it couldn’t be.” So I rushed to her, brimming with excitement until she told me to go up to him and introduce myself. Then that’s what I did, I set aside any concerns for my disheveled look and went up to the one and only creator of in my humble opinion, two most earth-staggering sentences in the world of literature, “Aku ingin mencintaimu dengan sederhana” “I want to […]

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I’ll Be Right There by Kyung-Shook Shin

  This emotionally explosive read has left me with a book hangover that I can’t seem to budge that easily. “I’ll Be Right There” has also made its way as a first Korean read and was I glad to have stumbled upon it at one of my favorite bookstores in the capital. Here we have four college friends as they deal with their own personal scars against the backdrop of an unsettled South Korean capital of Seoul in the 80’s that reminded me of what my own country experienced back in ’98. Constant student protests were no stranger to them, but this book has proven that sometimes unresolved pain and mistakes of the past could take a bigger toll than the sharp tang of tear gas could do to the […]

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