Book Review: What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver

My next review is one of Raymond Carver’s collection of short stories I’ve heard nothing but brilliant things about. How it’s like a loving pat in the back and a slap in the face all at once. Now, if there’s one literary fear that I have, it’s short stories. I guess I’ve always been spoiled with an in-depth plot that sudden twists and turns of a short story just puts me off. But this year, I’m determined to put aside that fear and embrace all the surprises and wild guesses that come while reading this form of literature. Anyways, What We Talk About When We Talk About Love is a spectacular start of my “therapy” because of how honest it was writtan, and I felt every bit of affection and […]

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Book Review: Abdurrahman Wahid by Greg Barton

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle,” It might be a little strange to quote Martin Luther King Jr. in this context but I think it absolutely represents what this (authorized) biography of Abdurrahman Wahid is all about. My nation’s first democratically elected president, was misunderstood by international media throughout his 21-month presidency from 1999 to 2001, often portrayed as a clumsy, and even comical, half-blind Muslim cleric. Now, Indonesian history wasn’t part of my curriculum for most of my childhood schooling as I had to live abroad so Greg Barton’s book has definitely helped me gain an insight into how both this man and my country came to be. Gus Dur, as he was colloquially known, became well-equipped with faith and […]

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Book Review: The Hour of the Star by Clarice Lispector

“All the world began with a yes” What a book to close this roller-coaster of a year, a stunning and tragic view inside the life of our girl Macabéa, who never knew what it was like to feel an ounce of whatever was good. May that be a thought, an emotion, and even if she did, she would question if it was alright to feel that way. “She had been born with a legacy of misfortune, a creature from nowhere with the expression of someone who apologizes for occupying too much space,” An orphaned child from the poverty-ridden area of northeastern Brazil, Macabéa thrives as a typist. But, she is unwell, impoverished that she could barely even afford pads during her period. She never knew a parent’s love, or much […]

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